Three Little Words

You know I’m not really about dissing (do people still use that word?) anyone or anything. But it’s hard to hold my tongue when I see a typo on a prominent sign, in the store of a major retailer, on one of the busiest streets in the world.

Before I go any further, let me be clear: I love me some North Face gear. In fact, it is safe to say that my North Face down coat has probably saved me from pneumonia.

That said, I have to register this complaint about an Internet kiosk at the North Face store at 73rd Street and Broadway in Manhattan. In block letters over the screen is supposed to be the message: “Exploration Starts Here.” Meaning, you can plan for your adventures  virtually, even before you don your North Face duds and go a-traveling for real.

Except, that’s not what it says, because the last “e” in “here” is missing. So instead it reads: “Exploration Starts Her.”

My more generous-minded Cousin P suggested that maybe the computer is showing a movie about a woman setting out on adventures. Hence “Exploration Starts Her…” on her journey. I don’t think so. This sign is clearly supposed to say “Exploration Starts Here.”

Another friend questioned whether the letter had fallen off. Pretty sure not. Because I have looked closely, on several occasions (here would be a good time for a perfectly justifiable ‘get a life’ comment), and I have come to the conclusion there was NEVER an “e” there.

Now, if I were a betting girl, I’d wager that before North Face put up a kiosk in the middle of a Manhattan store there were team meetings, and proposals, and specs, and more meetings, a revised proposal, and an editorial team that only had to edit: Three. Little. Words.

For me, though, the saddest part is that I seem to be just about the only one who noticed. When I pointed it out in December (nicely, I promise) the salesperson said “Oh yeah, I think someone else mentioned that like a few weeks ago.” Another salesperson added: “The person who fixes that is on vacation.” Fair enough, it was Christmas time.

But, now it’s three months later, and the Internet kiosk still stands “e”-less; shoppers pass buying vests and jackets and hiking boots, oblivious to the the typo in their midst.